Are there any nickels made of silver

“War Nickels,” or Jefferson Nickels that were minted from 1942-1945, are also popular among coin collectors due to their historical significance and the fact that they contain a small amount of silver rather than nickel. The CoinTrackers.com crew has compiled an awesome list we've dubbed 25 Most Valuable Nickels, and the page details the most valuable nickels minted in the United States from the late 1800's to the early 2000's. (Updated 2020) The values are descending so the most valuable are at the top. (so its a count up and not a countdown). However, there are a few specimens that are worth a little more. Jefferson Nickels made between 1942 in 1945, are also called War Nickels and consisted of 35% silver. This means they are worth more than face value and most of them have been removed from circulation. On March 27, 1942, Congress authorized a nickel made of 50% copper and 50% silver, but gave the Mint the authority to vary the proportions, or add other metals, in the public interest. The Mint's greatest concern was in finding an alloy that would use no nickel, but still satisfy counterfeit detectors in vending machines.

Nickels were first minted in the United States in 1866. At that time most coins were made out of silver or gold. The United States made lower denomination coins out of pure copper. Although the nickel is silver in color, it has no silver in it. Nickels lack the glitter of silver and gold and are not popular amongst coin collectors.

Hi Mary — There are several metals that are used in the manufacturing of silver flatware. Sterling silver flatware is normally indicated by some variation of a “925” marking that would indicate it being 92.5% silver and alloyed with 7.5% of something else that is usually copper or nickel. It isn't all for nothing. As stated 1942-1945 nickels with the mint mark above Monticello are 35% silver. 1950d, 1938d, 1938s, 1939d, 1939s all bring a premium depending on condition, so if you have any of them they may have some added value. Earlier nickels are not worth saving for their metal content any moreso than modern nickels because the alloy is the same today as it has been since 1866. EXCEPT for the War Nickels 1942-1945 with the large mintmark above Monticello (including a 'P' for Philly) which have silver in them and are worth well above face. War nickels are 35 pct. silver. They are 1942 P.S, 1943 P.D.S, 1944 P.D.S, 1945 P.D.S. The mintmark will be on the reverse above the dome. The 1950 D was worth some good money at one time years ago.

Few nickels had circulated in the western states before the 1880s (people there preferred silver and gold coins); interest in the new Liberty Head design had led to increasing use of nickels there. Good economic conditions and high demand for nickels for use in coin-operated devices caused the piece to circulate throughout the nation by 1900.

More than 30 million Jefferson Nickels were struck in 1938 and they were While a five-cent piece may seem like an unlikely coin to have any value for significance and the fact that they contain a small amount of silver rather than nickel. 2 Jan 2020 However, there are a few specimens that are worth a little more. Jefferson Nickels made between 1942 in 1945, are also called War Nickels the Mint used an alloy of 35% silver and made the mint mark larger and moved  5 Dec 2016 The only Jefferson nickels to contain silver were from 1942–1945 and they No, nickels were only made of 35% silver for a very brief time—from 1942 to 1945,  There's a technique I normally use when I'm looking for old nickels, and it's If I get lucky and find any coins that I wish to keep, I can just swap those out with Silver nickels were made from 1942 through 1945 and have a large mintmark over